Project 2: Revision templates

We have two templates (outline structures) that we have been using in class to think about generating the structure of an essay and of a key component within the essay–the close reading and forwarding of a text within on of the body paragraphs.

You can use these templates to guide revision as well. Here they are.

[1]Three-Act Thesis

Act 1: Introduction/Set UP

Given:

Critical Problem/Disturbance:

Your Response/Thesis:

Act 2: Complications/Examples for your thesis [for this size essay, around 2-4, each being a paragraph]

Complication #1: [Cite passage you will forward]

Keywords/ideas that relate back to the thesis [sketch how you will extend the quotation in your interpretation]:

Complication #2: [Cite passage you will forward]

Keywords/ideas that relate back to the thesis [sketch how you will extend the quotation in your interpretation]:

Complication #3: [Cite passage you will forward]

Keywords/ideas that relate back to the thesis [sketch how you will extend the quotation in your interpretation]:

For this final complication—you might anticipate and respond to a possible objection or counter to your argument—leading you into your conclusion

Act 3: Conclusion

Climax: answer to question/solving of problem—where you reinforce your thesis, having explored the various complications

Resolution: new normal—where this leaves the reader; larger implications reader might take from this argument and apply elsewhere.

[2]Forwarding (quoting and interpreting a text in your argument–in the paragraphs in Act 2.

Use Harris’ four steps of Forwarding to structure the paragraph:

1]Illustrate (paraphrase, introduce the quotation and context before quoting).

2]Borrow (quote from the text, selecting deliberately–text that will work for your argument to follow it)

3]Authorize (identify keywords and ideas from the quotation and elsewhere to establish the focus of your interpretation–and avoid merely summarizing the quotation).

4]Extend (connect the quotation to your argument, your thesis; pay attention to implications in the quotation that allow you to extend your argument; consider other perspectives or ideas suggested by the quotation)

 

 

 

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